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    Lady In Lace wins The Deccan Fillies Championship Stakes (GR.3)
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    Prevalent Force wins The Deccan Colts Championship Stakes (Gr.3)
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    Mathaiyus wins The President Of India Gold Cup (Gr.1)
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    Mathaiyus wins the The Indian St. Leger (Gr.1)
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    Sana Wins The Calcutta Monsoon Derby (Gr.2)
  • Lady In Lace wins The Kingfisher Ultra Pune Derby (Gr.1)
  • Castlebridge wins The Jayachamaraja Wadiyar Golf Club Mysore 2000 Guineas (Gr.3)
  • Castlebridge wins The Mysore Derby Gr.1
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Jagdish, one of a rare breed


Jagdish Singh Chauhan delighted Indian railbirds for well over four decades. He rode over 1960 winners and had success in 98 classics. He quit in November 1986 at the age of 56,just short of achieving a grand double, i.e. riding 2000 winners and winning 100 classics, due to a nagging back injury and pressure from his family to give up the spartan lifestyle and risks associated with a top-flight jockey. ``I never consciously went after records. My overriding ambition right through my career was always to win,'' says Jagdish who could have gone on to achieve the coveted landmark had he wished to.

Former Chairman of the Turf Authorities of India and of the Bangalore Turf Club, P.G.Belliappa a newspaper columnist for a long time profiles the legend.

In a sport where many are viewed with suspicion, Jagdish enjoyed the respect and affection of race-goers for over 40 years because of his integrity. ``People considered me an honest jockey and had faith in me. The general public, Stewards and colleagues honored me with their affection.'' This has been my greatest satisfaction, he says. '' What counts in the final analysis is the reputation that Jagdish carried with the regular racegoer - an opinion which found expression in the poll conducted by the periodical Horses and Courses in 1977. Normally cynical and opinionated racegoers voted him the most reliable and honest jockey seen for years. Further comment is superfluous.

Jagdish hardly had any brushes with authority, having been suspended only twice in 40 years, both for two days apiece in Bangalore in 1950 and in Pune in 1973. -For interference. And the fines? Except for Rs.10, 000/- imposed in 1984 season in Guindy, they were never more than Rs.500 under any other Turf Authority. That whopping fine reduced by Rs.3,000/- on appeal, was for negligent riding. `It was very unfair and it hurt me very much, because I was not guilty says Jagdish." While I was changing the whip from my left hand to the right, the reins slipped accidentally. For this such a big fine of Rs.10,000/- had been imposed. In any case the other horse won from start to finish and I chased him all the way without hope." Newspaper reports on the incident do suggest that he may have been the victim of infighting in the club.

Jagdish made his debut, with a ride on King Solomon at the Pune Race Course on August 11, 1945. Jagdish hit the limelight with the legendary Baba Khan, the trainer with whose stable he had been associated for 15 years - eight with Baba Khan and after his death in 1961, seven with his son Khan Baba. It was also just after Baba Khan had died in 1961 that Jagdish suffered the most serious accident of his career. Riding Island Manor at Calcutta at the end of the season, he clipped the heels of a front runner. The resulting fall fractured his spine in three places and his pelvis in two places, thus forcing him to spend three months in plaster. Even then, he had returned immediately to the saddle 15 days after the plaster was removed, prompted by the demands of the stable headed by raw youngster - Khan Baba, then just 21.This loyalty to his erstwhile mentor's family, in the face of tempting offers to switch stables from Bombay and Calcutta, drew an appreciative letter from an unknown correspondent. Still treasured by Jagdish and strangely prophetic it reads, "Congratulations! Like a true Rajput you have not deserted your master. Success is bound to come to you, so full of gratitude" .The tally of 98 Classic and more than 1960 wins from around 9,000 rides has certainly proved the unknown admirer right. The classic tally is next only to that of Vasant Shinde who has recorded over 100 classic successes.

How he did come to become a jockey? The thought of his early days brings a smile to his face as he recalls how at 13 when he first joined the RWITC Apprentice School in 1943 at Pune, the goals were very simple. To get admission, to learn to ride, finish his apprenticeship and then to ride winners. He stuck to his task and the successes and rewards had followed. '`That sounds like Krishna in the Bhagvada Gita'', I tell him straight faced. ``No goals, I will continue to ride only as long as I can and enjoy riding'', Jagdish had said as he neared the dream double. He did concede that there was pressure from his admirers, owners and friends to complete the double of 2000 winners and 100 classics. Prominent among them was Dr. M. A. M. Ramaswamy for whom he had won more than 50 Classic and for whose patronage he is very grateful. MAM should know the feeling. He is in the Guinness Book of Records for his 300 plus Classic wins. His trainer, A.B.David, too, had completed a century of Classic wins. Hence if Jagdish reached the coveted target it would have been a unique treble. Alas, it was not to be as Jagdish called it off on the threshold of creating history.

The time frame of four decades of his stint stretches from just before Independence, when racing was dominated by the British and the Maharajas, till the late 80's the period during which racing in India had undergone radical changes. Jagdish belonged to the second batch of the RWITC Apprentice School. The first batch included Pandu Khade, Shamu Chavan and Kheem Singh. Jagdish was easily the star performer of his class. Apprenticed to D. W. Balfour, his first win came on King Solomon, the horse on which he made his debut, on March 6, 1946, at Bombay when just 16. The 'King' gave him his second win, too, but he had to wait six months for it. Jagdish's indenture was transferred to Buckley in 1947as Balfour left for Calcutta, and he completed his apprenticeship fittingly enough on Vijayadashmi day in 1949. The first of the string of Championships that were to follow came during this period, Jagdish finishing as the leading apprentice during 1947-48 season with 13 wins. It was an extraordinary performance when compared with the 19wins scored by the then leading jockeys, Pandu Khade and Damodar, who tied for 1st place. The association with Baba Khan, whom Jagdish considers the best Indian trainer ever, started in 1953. This flat assertion is no ordinary compliment, for Jagdish has ridden for every top-ranking trainer in the country - Balfour, Buckley, Talib, Baba Khan, KhanBaba, Sam Hill, S. M. Shah, R.R. Byramji, Darashah and A.B. David, all having retained him at some stage of his career. A shrewd man, with a deep knowledge of horses, Baba Khan also had extraordinary powers of observation recalls Jagdish, emphasising that he was so gifted that he could spot flaws even in horses from other stables. As an illustration of the master trainer's prowess, he then proceeds to tell the story of Canny Scot's Indian Derby success in 1958, and of how Baba Khan had brought a transformation in Canny Scot's staying ability with a quick change in training methods. Canny Scot had placed second to Decoration in the Indian 2000 Guineas and Jagdish had told Baba Khan that Canny Scot appeared to tire a bit. Baba Khan's reply was, ``Yes Jaggu, next time you and not the horse will be tired''. Jagdish had no opportunity to see Canny Scot before his next outing in the Sir H. M.Mehta Gold Cup (1 1/4M), a trial for the Derby. He had been busy riding in Madras and Calcutta and had arrived in Bombay after a delayed air journey. In the paddock he could hardly believe his eyes on seeing a transformed Canny Scot. '`It was almost magic that Baba Khan had wrought with colt and I had no hesitation in saying that Canny Scot would win''. He did then went on to claim the Derby.

Racing has changed, so comparisons are not very valid is the diplomatic answer when asked to rate today's trainers against the giants of yesteryear and against each other. Pressed further, Jagdish does not go beyond Byramji and Aris David. ``Both are in the same class, but each trains differently" and that their tremendous success speaks for itself. David has since retired after his break with his mentor Dr M A M Ramaswamy for want of good patronage. Similarly rather than compare the relative merits of today's jockeys, Jagdish prefers to talk of the idols during his apprenticeship and of colleagues, none of whom are in the saddle anymore. Wally Sibritt, Billy Evans, Edgar Britt, Pandu Khade, Shamu Chavan, Purtu Singh and Kheem Singh. "It was a very good school for me because I competed against many great jockeys and it was very hard for one to win without both talent and dedication". "Evans and Sibritt wielded a particularly strong influence, the latter then riding for Balfour, teaching him everything from holding the reins to judgment of pace. He agrees that today there is lack of competition, with the top jockeys thinly spread out at all the centers, has made for a much poorer riding standard. In addition there are not too many people around of the calibre of Soli Captain, who, recalls Jagdish, as a Stipendiary Steward during his apprenticeship days, had instilled a strong sense of discipline among jockeys. The situation worsened after the Bangalore Turf Club, in an effort to break the boycott by the jockeys in 1977,called to force recognition of their Association, licensed a number of apprentices and riding boys rather prematurely. Jagdish, who was one of the three Vice Presidents of the Jockey's Association during those turbulent times, still preserves the victorious outcome of that boycott: A letter from the Turf Authorities of India granting recognition to the Jockey's Association.

Jagdish is already on record that Squanderer was `'the greatest''. "I have never ridden a horse like him; he could have won with anyone as he knew what was expected of him", and "we never knew what he was really capable of" are some of the phrases he uses to describe the champion. The dramatic victory in the1977 RWITC Invitation Cup considered Squanderer's best race ever has been told before but Jagdish enjoys re-enacting the drama. "From seven furlongs I was in trouble, stuck on the rails with horses on the outside, even inside the final two furlongs. In the meanwhile the English mare, Certainty, had taken a 3length lead. I lifted Squanderer through a narrow gap, pushing aside Ghazab, straightened him out and tapped him on the shoulder less than 1 and 1/2 furlong out. The response was electrifying, like changing gears in a car. Squanderer immediately stretched out to win by 3 and ΒΌ lengths clocking 2m. 4/5s. Just 2/5 second of the course record set by Finalist in 1941. Had I really gone for the stick, I am sure that even after all the bad luck during the race I could have beaten Finalist's timing. To set the record straight he also talks about the only time Squanderer was beaten. That was the ‘76 Colts Trial when he finished third to Red Satin. Squanderer was not his usual self-that day, he explains. He was nervous, refused to go into the stalls quietly and was, in addition, very unlucky in having to travel on the outside besides being chopped off more than once. The final tribute comes in the punch line. He should have represented India.

It was Jagdish's honesty, dedication and talent and not mere good fortune, which got him the retainers from the big stables, the rides on the best horses and the championship titles. Plenty of owners and trainers always stood in line, requesting him to ride their horses in big races. So he has always had a good choice. In a prestigious Classic race of course there was more pressure. ``After all the chance of running comes only once in the career of a horse,'' he says.

Jagdish’s career included such feats as riding six winners and placing second, in a card of seven events at Mysore. Only one other Indian jockey P.Shanker has come close having ridden six winners & a fourth also at Mysore. Five winners in a day were recorded more than once at Bangalore, Bombay and Madras. But what is unique is the sequence of wins in major (now graded) races at three different centres on successive days in 1963.It started when Jagdish won the Governor’s Cup at Calcutta with the Mcphearson trained Commuter on a Saturday. He then caught the night mail flight to Nagpur (those were the days of unpressurised Dakotas), and changed planes to land in Bombay early Sunday morning. After riding the S.M.Shah trained Ali Baba to victory in the Eclipse Stakes of India, he caught a similar mail flight again via Nagpur to Madras. Arriving on Monday - Pongal day - he rode the Khan Baba trained Neon to victory in the South India Derby.

Jagdish had another major accident in 1984 when he fell from Silver Meteor at the starting gates at Guindy. The resulting broken leg kept him out of the saddle for six months but ironically his comeback winner was on Silver Meteor in Mysore. Family pressure to give up the risks of the sport and nagging injuries finally persuaded Jagdish to hang up his boots in November 1986 at the age of 56. Jagdish however continues his association with the sport as a race day stipendiary steward with the BangaloreTurf Club since 1991. Two of his sons, Vijay Singh and Bharat Singh, who apprenticed under A.B.David and Byramji respectively, are successful trainers at Calcutta.

Adorning the walls of his spacious living room are two photo frames, the only ones Jagdish has on display of his two Invitation Cup winners. A good 3 1/2ftby 2 1/2ft each, one frame contains a blow up of Jagdish on Commanche returning after his Indian Derby triumph. The other has a number of smaller photos of Own Opinion’s Invitation Cup victory, the presentation, the leading in and the finish, with him stealing a sideways glance at Royal Tern. Own Opinion, the Ramaswamy-owned chestnut, the only Indian bred invited to participate in the Japan Cup and also both the highest stakes earner of that era and one with the maximum number of wins - 29 in India- is rated next best to Squanderer by Jagdish. He was outclassed in the Japan Cup where he beat home only two, but it must be borne in mind that he was running anti-clockwise, that he was getting past his prime, was feeling his joints, that the cold and the quarantine had affected him and yet he had run the fastest race of his life clocking 2 minutes 28 seconds for 2400M. Own Opinion's Invitation and other battles for supremacy with Royal Tern were titanic but in Jagdish's opinion, the two were very different. While Royal Tern was more brilliant and unbeatable over a mile, Own Opinion was a true stayer. Both had ``Class'' and it was always touch and go when they clashed over Derby trips. But, adds Jagdish," in the Leger I would beat him always". While Squanderer was the greatest, Commanche, as could be already gauged by the size of the portrait was his favourite. Except for his maiden start, which he lost, he ran the rest of his 15 races with Jagdish up, the partnership continuing till Commanche retired after the Indian St. Leger. " I used to call him ‘millionaire’ for he was the first Indian horse to win a million rupees", he recounts fondly, adding he was "handsome, well behaved, never vicious and a perfect gentleman."

An apt description of Jagdish as well.
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1. Jagdish being introduced to the then President of India Fakruddin Ali Ahmed at Mahalaxmi

2. Jagdish astride Hard Held, being led in by trainer S S Shah

3. Astride Squanderer, winner of the Indian Derby, being led in by trainer Rashid Byramji.

4. Jagdish being congratulated by the President of India after his success in the premier racing event of the country at Hyderabad in 1976. Incidentally, races used to be held at Secunderabad. Hyderabad now has a full-fledged race course of its own at Malakpet.

1. Astride Commanche, winner of the Indian Derby. Leading in the winner are trainer Rashid Byramji, owners Yogesh M Shah and Ranjit V bhat (right)



2. Freeze of Jagdish with Prince of Brar, son of the then Nizam of Hyderabad. Also seen is leading trainer of the era Baba Khan (second from right)


3. Astride Randam Harvest, winner of the South Indai Derby Stakes 1960. Trainer Baba Khan (left) and owner S M Ramakrishna Rao are also seen.


4. Guiding one of his innumerable Derby winners at Guindy, Chennai. Jagdish had about 23 Derby success to his credit.

1. Seen with the Maharaja of Mysore Sri Jayachamaraja Waidyar, after guiding Free Manor to victory in the Maharaja's Gold Cup in 1959. Those days, the Maharaja's Cup enjoyed more importance the Derby, with the fanfare associated with the event, bringing even non race-goers to races. The Maharaja used to drive to the race course from the Palace in a open ladau, drawn by four horses on a newly laid sand path. Incidentally, the Maharaja patronised the sport a great deal. The race courses at Mysore and Bangalore were gifted to the club by him.



2. Feeeze of the presentation ceremony of the Berar Gold Cup in 1959. Rajah of Bobili (third from right), Zamindar of Chikkvaram (extreme right), trainer Baba Khan and P Shivan (second from right). Incidentally, Shankar was the first Indian jockey to complete 1000 winners. The late Shivan was called as the Trainer of Trainers, with many of his assistants being highly successful trainers at all over the country.


3. Jagdish being congratulated by General Srinagesh, the Governor of Andhra Pradesh, after his success astride Albella Chella in the Afsur-ul-Mulk Gold Cup in 1962


4. Maharani Gayatridevi of Jaipur felicitating Jagdish on his completion of 1000 winners in July 1973.
1& 2: The massive crowd that turned out for the 1958 running of the Indian Derby

3. Canny Scot (Jagdish up), winner of the 1958 Indian Derby, being led in by trainer Baba Khan and owner M P Davis

4. Jagdish and trainer F W Northmore at the presentation ceremony of the Aga Khan's Spring Cup (1950). The winner was Eastern Sea.

5. Noted comedian of the Hindi cinema Mahmood Ali leads in Hard Held (Jagdish up)

6. Maharaja of Kolhapur leading in Chetak, who won one of the events way back in 1960. Also seen is trainer Baba Khan. The Maharaja is wearing the famous Kholapuri chappal (sandals)

 

 

DERBY WINNERS

SL NO
YEAR
CLASSIC
HORSE
TRAINER
DISTANCE
CENTRE
1
1958
THE INDIAN DERBY
CANNY SCOT
BABA KHAN
2400 M
BOMBAY
2
1960
THE SOUTH INDIAN DERBY
RANDOM HARVEST
BABA KHAN
2400 M
MADRAS
3
1963
THE SOUTH INDIAN DERBY
NEON
KHAN BABA
2400 M
MADRAS
4
1968
THE INDIAN DERBY
OUR SELECT
S. M. SHAH
2400 M
BOMBAY
5
1970
THE DELHI DERBY
LOOK OUT
AZIZ MAHMOUD
1600 M
DELHI
6
1972
THE DELHI DERBY
GRAND RAPIDS
R. RASHID BYRAMJI
1600 M
DELHI
7
1975
THE BANGALORE DERBY
COMMANCHE
R. RASHID BYRAMJI
2000 M
BANGALORE
8
1976
THE INDIAN DERBY
COMMANCHE
R. RASHID BYRAMJI
2400 M
BOMBAY
9
1976
THE BANGALORE DERBY
SQUANDERER
R. RASHID BYRAMJI
2000 M
BANGALORE
10
1977
THE INDIAN DERBY
SQUANDERER
R. RASHID BYRAMJI
2400 M
BOMBAY
11
1979
ARC DE TRIOMPHE
OWN OPINION
A. B. DAVID
2400 M
BANGALORE
12
1979
THE NILGIRI'S DERBY
NICOLETTE
A. B. DAVID
1600 M
OOTACAMUND
13
1979
THE DECCAN DERBY
ARISTOCRAT
A. B. DAVID
2000 M
HYDERABAD
14
1979
THE MYSORE DERBY
ARISTOCRAT
A. B. DAVID
2000 M
MYSORE
15
1980
THE SOUTH INDIAN DERBY
ARISTOCRAT
A. B. DAVID
2400 M
MADRAS
16
1980
THE GOLCONDA DERBY
NICOLETTE
A. B. DAVID
2400 M
HYDERABAD
17
1981
THE GOLCONDA DERBY
ABERADER
R. FOLEY
2400 M
HYDERABAD
18
1982
THE NILGIGI'S DERBY
BIRTHDAY GIRL
A. B. DAVID
1600 M
OOTACAMUND
19
1982
THE MYSORE DERBY
BIRTHDAY GIRL
A. B. DAVID
2000 M
MYSORE
20
1983
ACE DE TRIOMPHE
MASTER ICEY
A. B. DAVID
2400 M
BANGALORE
21
1983
THE NILGIRI'S DERBY
MALTESE PRINCE
A. B. DAVID
1600 M
OOTACAMUND
22
1983
THE MYSORE DERBY
QUEEN OF THE HILLS
A. B. DAVID
2000 M
MYSORE
23
1986
THE CALCUTTA DERBY
TUG OF WAR
N. KARANJAWALLA
2400 M
CALCUTTA

1000 GUINEAS WINNERS

SL NO
YEAR
CLASSIC
HORSE
TRAINER
DISTANCE
CENTRE
1
1959
THE S. I. 100 GUINEAS
LADY JOSEPHINE
BABA KHAN
1600 M
MADRAS
2
1960
INDIAN 1000 GUINEAS
REQUEST
D. N. ADENWALLA
1600 M
BOMBAY
3
1962
THE S. I. 100 GUINEAS
NEON
KHAN BABA
1600 M
MADRAS
4
1970
FILLIES TRIAL STAKES
ROCK HAVEN
J. TYRELL
1600 M
BANGALORE
5
1971
THE INDIAN 1000 GUINEAS
VICTORIOUS
R. RASHID BYRAMJI
1600 M
BOMBAY
6
1974
FILLIES TRIAL STAKES
SWEET MEMORIES
R. RASHID BYRAMJI
1600 M
BANGALORE
7
1974
MYSORE 1000 GUINEAS
SWEET MEMORIES
R. RASHID BYRAMJI
1600 M
MYSORE
8
1975
GHAZAB
D. N. ADENWALLA
R. RASHID BYRAMJI
1600 M
BOMBAY
9
1975
MYSORE 1000 GUINEAS
EKTA
NARAYAN SINGH
1600 M
MYSORE
10
1976
INDIAN 1000 GUINEAS
REPRINT
R. RASHID BYRAMJI
1600 M
BOMBAY
11
1978
NILGIRIS FILLIES TRIAL
MOHINI
R. R. REDDY
1400 M
OOTACAMUND
12
1978
MYSORE 1000 GUINEAS
SHIMMERING GOLD
M. M. GALSTAUN
1600 M
MYSORE
13
1979
NILGIRIS FILLIES TRIAL 
NICOLETTE
A. B. DAVID
1400 M
OOTACAMUND
14
1979
FILLIES TRIAL STAKES
NICOLETTE
A. B. DAVID
1600 M
BANGALORE
15
1979
MYSORE 1000 GUINEAS
NICOLEETE
A. B. DAVID
1600 M
MYSORE
16
1979
BANGALORE 1000 GUINEAS
NICOLEETE
A. B. DAVID
1600 M
BANGALORE
17
1979
S. I. 1000 GUINEAS
NICOLEETE
A. B. DAVID
1600 M
MADRAS
18
1981
HYDERABAD FILLIES TRIAL STAKES
BLUE ICE
A. G. THOMPSON
1600 M
HYDERABAD
19
1981
S. I. 1000 GUINEAS
BLUE ICE
A. B. DAVID
1600 M
MADRAS
20
1982
NILGIRIS FILLIES TRIAL
BIRTHDAY GIRL
A. B. DAVID
1400 M
OOTACAMUND
21
1982
FILLIES TRIAL STAKES
BIRTHDAY GIRL
A. B. DAVID
1600 M
BANGALORE
22
1982
MYSORE 1000 GUINEAS
BIRTHDAY GIRL
A. B. DAVID
1600 M
MYSORE
23
1982
GOLCONDA 1000 GUINEAS
BIRTHDAY GIRL
PRATAP REDDY
1600 M
HYDERABAD
24
1983
MYSORE 1000 GUINEAS
QUEEN OF THE HILLS
A. B. DAVID
1600 M
MYSORE
25
1983
S. I. 1000 GUINEAS
QUEEN OF THE HILLS
A. B. DAVID
1600 M
MADRAS
26
1986
NILGIRIS FILLIE TRIAL STAKE
REPONSION
A. B. DAVID
1600 M
OOTACAMUND

2000 GUINEAS WINNERS

SL NO
YEAR
CLASSIC
HORSE
TRAINER
DISTANCE
CENTRE
1
1959
S. I. 2000 GUINEAS
RANDOM HARVEST
BABA KHAN
1600 M
MADRAS
2
1965
CALCUTTA TRIAL STAKES
ROYAL SCOT
MCPHERSON
1600 M
CALCUTTA
3
1967
INDIAN 2000 GUINEAS
OUR SELECT
S. M. SHAH
1600 M
BOMBAY
4
1976
MYSORE 2000 GUINEAS
WIDE AWAKE
S. MOSES
1600 M
MYSORE
5
1976
INDIAN 2000 GUINEAS
SQUANDERER
R. RASHI BYRAMJI
1600 M
BOMBAY
6
1979
COLTS TRIAL STAKES
ARISTOCRAT
A. B. DAVID
1600 M
BANGALORE
7
1979
HYDERABAD COLTS
ARISTOCRAT
A. B. DAVID
1600 M
HYDERABAD
8
1979
MYSORE 2000 GUINEAS
NICOLETTE
A. B. DAVID
1600 M
MYSORE
9
1979
GOLCONDA 2000 GUINEAS
ARISTOCRAT
A. B. DAVID
1600 M
HYDERABAD
10
1979
S. I. 2000 GUINEAS
ARISTOCRAT
A. B. DAVID
1600 M
MADRAS
11
1980
MYSORE 2000 GUINEAS
BEAT THE CLOCK
R. RASHI BYRAMJI
1600 M
MYSORE
12
1980
HYDERABAD COLTS
ATTATURK
A. B. DAVID
1600 M
HYDERABAD
13
1981
NILGIRIS 2000 GUINEAS
FLASH PAST
A. B. DAVID
1400 M
OOTACAMUND
14
1981
MYSORE 2000 GUINEAS
BLUE ICE
A. B. DAVID
1600 M
MYSORE
15
1981
CALCUTTA 2000 GUINEAS
SUNRAY
H. DAVID
1600 M
CALCUTTA
16
1981
S. I. 2000 GUINEAS
BLUE ICE
A. B. DAVID
1600 M
MADRAS
17
1982
MYSORE 2000 GUINEAS
BIRTHDAY GIRL
A. B. DAVID
1600 M
MYSORE
18
1983
MYSORE 2000 GUINEAS
MALTESE PRINCE 
A. B. DAVID
1600 M
MYSORE

OAKS WINNERS

SL NO
YEAR 
CLASSIC 
HORSE
TRAINER
DISTANCE
CENTRE
1
1963
S. I. OAKS
NEON
KHAN BABA
2400 M
MADRAS
2
1972
THE INDIA OAKS
VICTORIOUS
R. RASHID BYRAMJI
2400 M
BOMBAY
3
1977
THE INDIAN OAKS
REPRINT
R. RASHID BYRAMJI
2400 M
BOMBAY
4
1980
THE GOLCONDA OAKS
NICOLETTE
A. B. DAVID
2400 M
HYDERABAD
5
1982
S. I. OAKS
BLUE ICE
A. B. DAVID
2400 M
MADRAS
6
1982
THE BANGALORE OAKS
TRIBUTE
A. B. DAVID
2400 M
BANGALORE
7
1983
S. I. OAKS
BIRTHDAY GIRL
A. B. DAVID
2400 M
MADRAS
8
1983
CALCUTTA OAKS
SREE PRIYA
MANOHAR LAL
2400 M
CALCUTTA
9
1984
CALCUTTA OAKS
ROMANTIC EVE
D. TODYWALLA
2400 M
CALCUTTA

ST. LEGER WINNERS

SL NO 
YEAR 
CLASSIC
HORSE
TRAINER
DISTANCE
CENTRE
1
1960
S. I. ST. LEGER
RANDOM HARVEST
BABA KHAN
1800 M
MADRAS
2
1961
S. I. ST. LEGER
ALI BABA
BABA KHAN
1800 M
MADRAS
3
1963
S. I. ST. LEGER
NEON
KHAN BABA
1800 M
MADRAS
4
1966
S. I. ST. LEGER
AKBAR
J. TYRRELL
2800 M
MADRAS
5
1968
THE INDIAN ST. LEGER
OUR SELECT
S. M. SHAH
2800 M
BOMBAY
6
1974
THE BANGALORE ST. LEGER
NECTAR QUEEN
R. RASHID BYRAMJI
2800 M
BANGALORE
7
1975
THE INDIAN ST. LEDER
SWEET MEMORIES
R. RASHID BYRAMJI
2800 M
POONA
8
1976
THE INDIAN ST. LEGER
COMMANCHE
R. RASHID BYRAMJI
2800 M
POONA
9
1977
THE BANGALORE ST. LEGER
SQUANDERER
R. RASHID BYRAMJI
2800 M
BANGALORE
10
1979
THE S. I. LEGER
OWN OPINION
A. B. DAVID
2800 M
MADRAS
11
1979
THE BANGALORE ST. LEGER
OWN OPINION
A. B. DAVID
2800 M
BANGALORE
12
1979
THE INDIAN ST. LEGER
OWN OPIOION
A. B. DAVID
2800 M
PUNE
13
1980
THE CALCUTTA ST. LEGER
ARISTOCRAT
A. B. DAVID
2800 M
CALCUTTA
14
1980
THE BANGALORE ST. LEGER
ARISTOCRAT
A. B. DAVID
2800 M
BANGALORE
15
1983
GOLCONDA ST. LEGER
TRIBUTE
A. B. DAVID
2800 M
HYDERABAD
16
1983
THE INDIAN ST. LEGER
TRIBUTE
A. B. DAVID
2800 M
PUNE
17
1984
S. I. ST. LEGER
QUEEN OF THE HILLS
A. B. DAVID
2800 M
MADRAS
18
1984
GOLCONDA ST. LEGER
MALTESE PRINCE
A. B. DAVID
2800 M
HYDERABAD
19
1985
S. I. ST. LEGER
SOLITAIRE
A. B. DAVID
2800 M
MADRAS
20
1986
CALCUTTA ST. LEGER
TUG OF WAR
N. KARANJAWALLA
2800 M
CALCUTTA